Healthy Holidays

The holidays are often a time of joyful experiences, but they can also bring about unique health challenges. During the season of giving, it’s still important to take care of yourself; we hope to provide a few tips to stay healthy this winter.

  • Talk about vaccination status: Most of the breakthrough COVID cases among residents on Campus have resulted from family gatherings. Before planning your holiday get together, talk with your loved ones about who will be in attendance and be sure they’ve all been vaccinated.
  • Be mindful of medications: With winter allergy, cold, and flu season upon us, be mindful of over-the-counter medications, which can have unintended side effects. For example, medications that have sedating or pain mediating effects, such as decongestants and cough syrups, can lead to confusion. Consult your doctor before taking beginning new over the counter medications for cold symptoms, and always being aware of multi-symptom products that treat coughing, sneezing, pain, etc. These medications can contain similar ingredients to medications you are already taking, which can put one at risk of overdose.
  • Healthy healing alternatives: Try alternatives to over the counter cold and allergy medications, such as resting, drinking more fluids, saline nasal sprays, and drinking honey in your tea for coughing.
  • Winter workouts: It’s easy to fall away from your usual exercise routine during the holidays but maintaining an exercise regime for 30 minutes a day helps boost your mood and energy levels and improves sleep quality. Try to carve out regular time for yourself to prioritize walks and healthy activity even on busy days.
  • Seasonal schedule: Keeping a usual medication and sleep schedule, especially if you are travelling, also boosts your immune system and energy levels. Aim to go to bed and wake up around the same time every day and be consistent in taking your medications on time. If traveling, have an updated copy of your medication list with you, along with your labeled medications and pill organizer. Before you leave for a trip, make sure you have enough medications for the duration of the trip and for the days after you return, so you won’t need to rush to refill medications.
  • Holiday food and spirits: Maintaining a healthy diet can be challenging during the holidays, but it is important to stick to your regular diet as closely as possible. It’s okay to treat yourself, but eat rich, fatty and sugary foods in moderation and add more vegetables to your holiday plate. This season is also a time when people are more likely to drink alcohol at parties and gatherings. Studies show that regular drinkers have a tendency to over-imbibe during the holidays, while many holiday drinkers who do not drink regularly need to be aware of their lower alcohol tolerance. Be mindful of the risk of confusion and falls when drinking and ask your physician or pharmacist about how alcohol interacts with your specific medications.


Keep these tips in mind and enjoy a happy, healthy holiday season this winter!!

Healthy Holidays

The holidays are often a time of joyful experiences, but they can also bring about unique health challenges. During the season of giving, it’s still important to take care of yourself; we hope to provide a few tips to stay healthy this winter.

Be Mindful of Medications: With winter cold and flu season upon us, be mindful of over the counter medications, which can have unintended side effects. For example, medications that have sedating or pain mediating effects, such as decongestants and cough syrups, can lead to confusion. Consult your doctor before taking beginning new over the counter medications for cold symptoms, and always being aware of multi-symptom products that treat coughing, sneezing, pain, etc. These medications can contain similar ingredients to medications you are already taking, which can put one at risk of overdose.

Healthy Healing Alternatives: Try alternatives to over the counter cold and allergy medications, such as resting, drinking more fluids, saline nasal sprays, and drinking honey in your tea for coughing.

Winter Workouts: It’s easy to fall away from your usual exercise routine during the holidays, but maintaining an exercise regime for 30 minutes a day helps boost your mood and energy levels. Try to carve out regular time for yourself to prioritize exercise even on busy days.

Seasonal Schedule: Keeping a usual medication and sleep schedule, especially if you are travelling, also boosts your immune system and energy levels. Aim to go to bed and wake up around the same time every day, and be consistent in taking your medications on time. If traveling, have an updated copy of your medication list with you, along with your labeled medications and pill organizer. Before you leave for a trip, make sure you have enough medications for the duration of the trip and for the days after you return, so you won’t need to rush to refill medications.

Holiday Food and Spirits: Maintaining a healthy diet can be challenging during the holidays, but it is important to stick to your regular diet as closely as possible. It’s okay to treat yourself, but eat rich, fatty and sugary foods in moderation and add more vegetables to your holiday plate. This season is also a time when people are more likely to drink alcohol at parties and gatherings. Studies show that regular drinkers have a tendency to over-imbibe during the holidays, while many holiday drinkers who do not drink regularly need to be aware of their lower alcohol tolerance. Be mindful of the risk of confusion and falls when drinking, and ask your physician or pharmacist about how alcohol interacts with your specific medications.

Keep these tips in mind and
enjoy a happy, healthy holiday
season this winter!! *

 

Look Into an Eye Exam

When was the last time someone sat you down, looked deep into your eyes and measured your intraocular pressure?

That’s the pressure inside your eye. Measuring it can find early signs of glaucoma, one of several common eye disorders that can appear without much warning.

Like many health conditions, eye diseases often are easiest to treat when found early. It’s one reason why eye experts suggest regular eye examinations—and why it might be time for you to schedule one.

A good look at your eyes

A comprehensive exam at an ophthalmologist’s office can be an eye-opening experience in many ways.

People often aren’t aware that their vision could be better than it is, according to the National Eye Institute (NEI). You may be surprised at how much more clearly you could be seeing.

You also might undergo some testing that literally widens your eye—or your pupils, at least. Called a dilated eye exam, it uses drops to enlarge your pupils so the doctor can more easily spot damage or eye diseases like age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy or glaucoma. Keep in mind that the test can leave your vision blurry for a few hours.

Other testing you can expect during a complete eye checkup:

  • A visual field test to measure your peripheral—or side—vision.
  • A light beam shined into your eyes to check pupil constriction.
  • A visual acuity test to assess how well you see at different distances.
  • A test to check for glaucoma by measuring eye pressure.

When to schedule eye checkups

The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) recommends vision exams for children:

  • At birth. All newborns should have a basic exam. Some newborns may need additional exams based on risk factors.
  • Between 6 months and 1 year of age.
  • Between 3 and 3 1/2 years of age.
  • When they start school and any time after that when a problem is suspected.

For adults, the AAO recommends comprehensive exams to screen for eye disorders at the following intervals:

  • At least one exam between ages 20 and 29.
  • At least two exams between ages 30 and 39.
  • A baseline screening for age-related disorders at age 40. (Your eye doctor will tell you how often to come in between ages 40 and 64.)
  • A complete exam at least every two years after age 65.

The above schedule is in addition to updates for lens prescriptions or treatment for eye injuries or ongoing problems.

Your eye doctor might suggest more frequent checkups if you:

  • Have a family history of eye problems.
  • Have high blood pressure or diabetes.
  • Had a previous eye injury.
  • Are an African American over age 40, which puts you at higher risk for glaucoma.

Keep your eyes healthy

There are a number of steps you can take between exams to keep your eyes healthy, according to the NEI. These include:

Ban rays. Wear protective sunglasses when outdoors. Look for shades that block 99 to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB rays.

Go for goggles. Wear the appropriate protective eyewear when working around the house or playing high-impact sports.

Look away. Give your eyes a rest after staring at the computer or focusing on anything for a long period of time. The NEI suggests looking away into the distance for about 20 seconds every 20 minutes.

For more information log on to www.azblue.com.

Protect Yourself and Others from the Stomach Bug

A stomach bug is floating around and we want you to be protected. Here a few pointers on how to stop this bug from “bugging” you.

  1. Practice proper hand hygienetake-washing-1165099
  2. Washing your hands carefully with soap and water for 20 seconds
  3. Use hand sanitizer if soap and water is not available
  4. Stay in your apartment avoiding all public ares if you are not feeling well
  5. Wait 48 to 72 hours before returning to public areas after your symptoms pass
  6. Take care in the kitchen
  7. Do not prepare food while infected
  8. Clean and disinfect contaminated surfaces
  9. Wash your laundry thoroughly

Residents: Notify Kathy Amend at x6192 if you have symptoms. Request free meal delivery at x6192 if feeling symptomatic

Staff: For employees please notify your immediate supervisor if you’re feeling any symptoms.